7 Best Home Remedies for Gas

Clinical review: Manuel Reis
Registered Nurse

Home remedies are an excellent, natural way to reduce excess gas and abdominal discomfort. A large part of these remedies work by improving stomach and intestinal function, which allows for stool to be eliminated by easier. This prevents the formation and accumulation of gas.

In addition to using home remedies, you should also maintain a healthy diet and perform exercise regular, as this will also help to promote optimal intestinal health and reduce the formation of gas.

You can also consume probiotics, either in food or supplements, on a daily basis, to help distribute good bacteria through the intestine. This also promotes intestinal health and decreases the formation of gas.

1. Sweetgrass tea

Sweetgrass is a medicinal plant that is traditionally used to treat digestive problems. It can also act on the intestine to stimulate functioning, which decreases the formation of gas.

In addition, some studies show that sweet grass can prevent the appearance of ulcers and even relieve muscular spasms caused be flatulence.

Ingredients

  • 1 to 2 tablespoons of sweetgrass seeds
  • 1 cup of boiling water 

How to prepare

Add the sweetgrass sweeds to the cup of boiling water and allow to soak for 10 minutes. Then strain through a mesh sieve and allow to cool. You can drink this several times per day, unsweetened.

2. Peppermint tea

Peppermint tee contains flavonoids that appear to be capable of inhibiting mast cells. Mast cells are immune cells that are present in great quantities in the intestine and can contribute to the formation of gas.

This plant also has antispasmodic action, which decreases spasms in the intestine and relieves discomfort.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon of dried mint leaves or 3 tablespoons of fresh mint leaves
  • 1 cup of hot water 

How to prepare

Add the mint leaves to the cup of hot water, cover and allow to soak for 10 minutes. Then strain through a mesh sieve, allow it to cool and drink 3 to 4 times per day.

3. Ginger tea

Ginger is a root with various medicinal properties which can be used to treat many traditional medicine problems. In fact, this root can also be used to treat excess gas, as it promotes intestinal function, reduces intestinal wall spasms, and treats mild inflammation that can worsen the formation of gas.

Ingredients

  • 1 cm de ginger root
  • 1 cup of hot water

How to prepare

Remove the peel from the ginger root and cut it into small pieces. Then add this to the cup of hot water and allow to soak for 5 minutes. Then strain through a mesh sieve, allow to cool, and drink 3 to 4 times per day.

4. Lemongrass tea

Lemongrass is another medicinal plant that is very much used in traditional medicine, especially to help with treatment of problems related to the gastrointestinal system. It appears to be able to relieve many types of discomfort experienced at the gastric and intestinal level, including excess gas.

In addition, lemongrass is also part of the peppermint plant family, and therefore it may share many similar benefits to fight intestinal gas.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon of dry lemongrass leaves
  • 1 cup of hot water

How to prepare

Place the lemongrass in the cup of hot water and allow it to soak for 10 minutes. Then strain through a mesh sieve, allow to cool, and drink 3 to 4 times per day.

5. Chamomile tea

Chamomile is a plant that is traditionally used to treat gastric problems and relieve discomfort within the entire digestive system. According to one study, this plant may be able to prevent the appearance of ulcers and inflammation in the digestive system, which can prevent the appearance of gas.

In addition, chamomile tea also has a calming effect, which helps to decrease discomfort caused by abdominal bloating.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon of dry chamomile
  • 1 cup of boiling water

How to prepare

Place the chamomile flowers in the cup of how water, and allow it to soak for 5 to 10 minutes. Then strain through a mesh sieve, allow to cool, and drink 3 to 4 times per day.

6. Wild celery tea

Wild celery, or the Angelica archangelica plant, is a medicinal plant that has a strong digestive action. It stimulates the production of gastric secretions which help with digestion. In addition, it helps to treat constipation due to its effect on intestinal movements, which also can lead to the reduction of gas accumulation.

Ingredients

  • 1 tabespoon of dried wild celery root
  • 1 cup of boiling water

How to prepare

Place the dried root in the cup of hot water an allow to soak for 5 minutes. Then strain through a mesh sieve, allow to cool, and drink after meals.

7. Exercise to eliminate gas

A great exercise to eliminate intestinal gas is to contract the abdominal area as show in the image below. This will stimulate gas to move along the intestinal tract, relieving any discomfort.

This exercise can be done by laying on your back, bending your knees and hugging them against your chest. This exercise should be repeated 10 consecutive times.

In addition to drinking teas and performing this exercise, you should also drink plenty of water, take walks and ride your back, as well as eat foods that are rich in fiber (like fruits, vegetables and leafy greens). This helps to control the formation of gas in the intestine. To improve intestinal function and reduce flatulence quickly, you should avoid eating pasta, bread, and sweet foods, which can cause gas. You should also avoid alcoholic drinks and soda. Learn about other methods you can try to eliminate gas.

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Atualizado por Tua Saude editing team, em January de 2022. Clinical review por Manuel Reis - Registered Nurse, em January de 2022.

References

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  • ALLAM, Shady et al.. Extracts from peppermint leaves, lemon balm leaves and in particular angelica roots mimic the pro-secretory action of the herbal preparation STW 5 in the human intestine. Phytomedicine. Vol.22, n.12. 1063-1070, 2015
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Clinical review:
Manuel Reis
Registered Nurse
Manuel graduated in 2013 and is licensed to practice under the Ordem dos Enfermeiros de Portugal, with license #79026. He specializes in Advanced Clinical Phytotherapy.