5 Natural Ways To Fight Nausea During Pregnancy

Medical review: Dr. Sheila Sedicias
Gynecologist

Nausea is a very common symptom during pregnancy and it can be relieved in simple and natural ways, like chewing a piece of ginger, drinking fresh lemonade, or sucking on a lemon popsicle.

Pregnancy-related nausea tends to occur in the morning but it can happen several times throughout the day. It is frequently felt in the first trimeste and usually resolves by the second, however some women may experience nausea throughout their entire pregnancy. 

If nausea persists or causes constant vomiting, you should inform your obstetrician. He or she will assess you and decide whether further intervention with medication is necessary. 

Following are some great natural ways to relieving nausea at home:

1. Drinking or chewing ginger 

Ginger has antiemetic properties that can help reduce nausea, It also promotes digestion and and decreases stomach wall irritation. 

You can use ginger for pregnancy by chewing on a piece of it in the morning. There are also ginger-infused hard candies available for purchase that may help to relieve nausea. To make ginger tea, you can place 1 g of ginger in a cup of boiling water and let it soak for a few minutes. Then, remove the ginger, allow to cool, and drink.

A lot of studies have shown that 1 gram of ginger per day for up to 4 days is safe during pregnancy. Ginger should be avoided, however, if you are close to you due date or if you have a history of miscarriage, blood clot issues, or a risk of hemorrhages. 

2. Drinking lemon juice 

Having freshly squeezed lemonade or even sucking on a lemon popsicle also helps reduce pregnancy-related nausea. Pregnant women who are not able to keep food down from vomiting or are experiencing intense nausea may have benefit from smelling a lemon or inhaling lemon essential oil.

3. Eating cold, light snacks

Cold foods such as yogurt, jello, fruit popsicles or salads can help relieve pregnancy sickness. These particular foods are also light and easy to digest, making them favorable during pregnancy.  Digestion slows down signficantly due to the hormonal changes, which can cause more nausea, which is why you should opt for less heavy meals and more frequent snacks.

4. Eating crackers

Crackers are easy to digest and are a good way of reducing morning sickness caused by an empty stomach. They can be eaten as soon as you wake up, before getting out of bed.  

5. Drink 2 liters of water a day

Having a lot of fluids throughout the day, but in small doses, can help relieve nausea and keep the body well hydrated, in addition to reducing fluid retention. 

It's important to drink at least 2 liters (½ gallon) of water per day. If you feel nauseous when drinking water, you can try adding a slice of lemon to your water or some pieces of ginger. 

How to avoid pregnancy sickness 

Some ways of preventing pregnancy nausea or avoiding discomfort from getting worse include:

  • Eating in short intervals (every two or three hours) and in small quantities;
  • Eat foods rich in vitamin B6 such as banana, watermelon, nuts, or boiled carrots;
  • Avoid foods that are overly seasoned or spicy;
  • Avoid strong odors from hot foods, perfumes, shower gel, or cleaning products;
  • Engage in regular, light exercise, to improve bowel movements and release endorphins, which are substances that give you a feeling of wellbeing.

In addition, acupuncture, an age-old Chinese therapy, done specifically on the P6 Neiguan point, located on the inside of the wrist, can be an effective treatment to avoid or relieve pregnancy nausea. Other options to stimulate this point include doing some pressure with the other hand's thumb or using an anti-nausea wristband, which can be bought in some pharmacies, drugstores, or on the internet.

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Atualizado por Tua Saude editing team, em March de 2022. Medical review por Dr. Sheila Sedicias - Gynecologist, em July de 2021.

References

  • TIRAN, Denise. Nausea and vomiting in pregnancy: safety and efficacy of self-administered complementary therapies. Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery. 8. 191-196, 2002
  • LINDBLAD, Adrienne J.; KOPPULA, Sudha. Ginger for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Can Fam Physician. 62. 2; 145, 2016
Show more references
  • LEE, Noel M.; SAHA, Sumona. Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy. Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 40. 2; 309–vii, 2011
  • DING, Mingshuang; et al. The effectiveness and safety of ginger for pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting: A systematic review. Women Birth. 26. 1; e26-30, 2013
Medical review:
Dr. Sheila Sedicias
Gynecologist
Physician graduated in Mastology and Gynecology by UFPE in 2008 and member no. 17459 of CRM-PE, Brazil.